Animal Field Guide

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Aardvark
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Aardvark

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Aardvarks can use their long, sticky tongues (up to 12 inches long!) to grab insects from termite mounds and ant nests.

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Addax
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Addax

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Fewer than 500 addaxes are believed to exist in the wild today, though they are fairly common in captivity.

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African Clawed Frog
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African Clawed Frog

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Tongueless and toothless, but a particularly ferocious amphibian.

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Alligator Gar
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Alligator Gar

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Despite their frightful, toothy appearance alligator gar are known as gentle giants and do not pose a threat to humans.

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Amazonian Royal Flycatcher
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Amazonian Royal Flycatcher

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Male amazonian royal flycatchers appear as normal brown birds until they are threatened or trying to attract a mate and they raise their brightly-colored crest.

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Amur Leopard
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Amur Leopard

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Amur Leopards are considered critically endangered, but the population has more than doubled in the past 20 years thanks to a new National Park and protections.

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Andean Flamingo
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Andean Flamingo

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Human mining activities are one of the main issues facing the habitat of the andean flamingo.

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Angler Fish
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Angler Fish

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Female anglerfish have a long lure protruding from their heads. This fleshy lure has a bioluminescent tip to attract prey.

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Asian Elephant
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Asian Elephant

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These elephants can communicate with low-pitched sounds that humans can barely hear. Other elephants, however, can hear them from up to 2 miles away.

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Axolotl
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Axolotl

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Axolotls do not heal by scarring, but can regenerate entire limbs as well as portions of their spinal cords, hearts, and other organs.

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Aye Aye
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Aye Aye

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Aye ayes' find food by percussive foraging, meaning they tap on trees to locate grubs, then gnaw a hole in the tree and use their long middle finger to pull out the bugs and grubs.

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Bearded Pig
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Bearded Pig

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Bearded pigs are very social and live in groups of up to several hundred pigs.

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Bilby
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Bilby

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Bilbys do not need to drink water because they get all the moisture they need through the foods they eat including seeds, plants, fruit, and insects

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Binturong
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Binturong

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Binturongs have scent glands which emit a smell many humans compare to popcorn.

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Black-Necked Grebe
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Black-Necked Grebe

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Though they usually avoid flying, black-necked grebes can fly up to 3,700 miles during migration. After migration they become flightless for two months in order to moult.

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Blobfish
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Blobfish

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You may know blobfish as pink, gooey looking fish with a droopy look, but they do not look that way in their natural habitat, deep below the sea. Their gelatinous makeup helps them from being crushed, and they look more like the image above.

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Blue Glaucus
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Blue Glaucus

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Blue glaucuses eat large, venomous prey and store their stinging cells in their body to use against predators.

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Blue Parrotfish
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Blue Parrotfish

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Blue parrotfish have teeth that are fused together to form a beak-like jaw, which is where they get their name.

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Boxer Crab
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Boxer Crab

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Boxer crabs sometimes hold sea anemones in their claws like pom-poms to use as protection against predators.

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Bristle-Thighed Curlew
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Bristle-Thighed Curlew

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Bristle-Thighed Curlews are capable of making continuous flight of up to 6,000 km.

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Brittle Star
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Brittle Star

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Brittle stars are named for their ability to break off an arm when threatened by predators which they can later regenerate.

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Budgett's Frog
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Budgett's Frog

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Budgett’s frogs will puff up to appear larger when threatened, and if the threat remains they may scream or bite.

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Buff-Tip Moth
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Buff-Tip Moth

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When the buff-tip moth sits perfectly still it blends in very well with birch branches.

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Buffy-Headed Marmoset
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Buffy-Headed Marmoset

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Buffy-headed marmosets deter predators by making loud sounds individually, or as groups.

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Bush Baby
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Bush Baby

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Bush babies are able to make shrill cries comparable to those of a human infant.

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California Condor
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California Condor

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The California Condor became extinct in the wild in 1987 when the US government captured the few remaining birds for a captive breeding program which multiplied the numbers enough that some have since been released back into the wild.

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Cantor’s Giant Softshell Turtle
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Cantor’s Giant Softshell Turtle

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Cantor’s Giant Softshell Turtle is also referred to as the “frog-faced softshell” due to it’s odd facial features.

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Capybara
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Capybara

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Capybaras can sleep in the water, and other animals use them like furniture.

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Cherry Barb
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Cherry Barb

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Male cherry barbs are bright red, while females are a golden yellow color.

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Chinese Giant Salamander
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Chinese Giant Salamander

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Chinese Giant Salamander are the largest amphibians in the world. They do not have gills and instead absorb oxygen through their skin.

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Chinese Water Deer
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Chinese Water Deer

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Chinese Water Deer grow fangs/tusks instead of antlers, hop like a rabbit and fight like goats. They are fuzzy and chunky.

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Christmas Tree Worm
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Christmas Tree Worm

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Each worm has two plumes. One for feeding and one for respiration. If threatened they retreat into their tubes.

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Clown Frogfish
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Clown Frogfish

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Clown frogfish have no teeth and swallow their prey whole. They do not swim, but move around using their fins and look like they are walking.

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Coatimundi
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Coatimundi

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The ankles of coatimundi are double jointed and extremely flexible allowing them to descend from trees headfirst.

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Colugo
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Colugo

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Colugos are skilled climbers, but quite helpless on the ground. They need a certain distance to glide and land safely.

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Crowned Sifaka
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Crowned Sifaka

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Crowned Sifakas live in groups of 2-8 animals, led by a matriarch.

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Dalmatian Pelican
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Dalmatian Pelican

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Dalmatian pelicans are the largest pelican and also one of the largest flying birds.

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Darwin’s Frog
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Darwin’s Frog

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Due to the Darwin Frog’s endangered status, captive colonies have been created at two zoos in Chile in an attempt to bolster numbers.

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Devils Hole Pupfish
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Devils Hole Pupfish

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Devils Hole pupfish are the rarest fish in the world, as they are only able to survive in a very small portion of Devils Hole in Death Valley National Park.

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Dugong
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Dugong

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Male dugongs grow tusks when they reach maturity. Their diet consists solely of sea grass.

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Dumbo Octopus
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Dumbo Octopus

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Dumbo octopuses move by slowly flapping their ear-like fins, and they use their arms to steer.

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Eastern Hognose Snake
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Eastern Hognose Snake

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The eastern hognose snake will flatten its head and hiss loudly when threatened. It may also roll over and play dead.

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Eastern Long-necked turtle
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Eastern Long-necked turtle

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Eastern long-necked turtles are also known as stinkers, because they can spray a pungent smell up to three feet away when feeling threatened.

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Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar
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Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Caterpillar

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The false eyespots on the caterpillar’s head serve to ward off predators by tricking them into believing they are a larger animal.

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Echidna
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Echidna

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Echidnas are egg laying mammals and their spines are actually modified hairs.

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Elephant Shrew
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Elephant Shrew

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Elephant shrews are not rodents, nor are they shrews. Recent evidence suggests that they are more closely related to elephants than shrews!

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Eurasian Hoopoe
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Eurasian Hoopoe

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The hoopoe is named after its call. It’s flight resembles that of a butterfly.